ncsss 2018 conference logo dates
     

Sessions

The agenda is updated as sessions are confirmed with speakers.
Check back often for session updates!

Thursday, November 8
9-10 a.m. Keynote Speaker  
10 - 10:50 a.m.

Engaging Students in Fundamental Biological Concepts Through UN Sustainability Goals

Advanced Biological Systems is year-long introductory biology course for Juniors at IMSA. It is aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development goals, the use of which has been identified as an initiative for curriculum development. These goals help to bring purpose to students’ learning. We have identified three of the seventeen goals as guideposts for our curriculum. These are clean water and sanitation, sustainable cities and communities, and good health and well-being. In this presentation, we will share our curriculum development process and examples of instruction linked to these UN goals.Presenter:

Sowmya Anjur
Don Dosch

 Science
 

Academic Retention through STEM Camps and Recitation Courses

The Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts has identified data points in student applications that may indicate first year academic struggles, particularly in the discipline of Chemistry.  In response and through faculty initiative, LSMSA created a STEMrichment camp and Chemistry Recitation course.  Through a week long summer camp and an additional Chemistry course throughout the academic year, students are strengthening their STEM skills while creating cohorts and study habits.  This session discusses the data analysis, the STEM camp, and the recitation course.  We will share our discoveries and methods for continued improvement.

Presenters:
Randy Key
Michele Stover, Ph.D.

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Chemistry, Math, Summer Programs
 

Ethics, Protest, and Racial Justice

In this session, we will discuss ways to integrate ethics into a high school humanities course.  We will explore key tenets of 7 to 10 ethical theories and view examples of assignments in which students are asked to apply the theories to relevant historical and contemporary cases.  We will also examine different forms of protests for racial justice and analyze their ethical implications.  Additionally, we will brainstorm useful classroom strategies for discussing ethics and race in humanities courses.

Presenter:
Jamie Lathan

Humanities
 

Expanding Access to Computer Science At NCSSM and Across NC: Lessons Learned from a New STEM Scholars Program with Rural Schools

The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) has implemented a new computer science program for 9th and 10th graders with rural school districts, and has built on momentum from the national CS4All movement to drive innovative thinking for improving computer science education on campus and with our partners. In this session, participants will learn about NCSSM’s new STEM Scholars Program in computer science as well as hear about lessons learned from our first year of implementation. Participants will also be provided with evidence-based practices in assessing computer science/computational thinking programs and courses.

Presenters:
Dr. Krissi Hewitt
Kendall Hageman

Computer Science
 

It Takes a Village: A Tiered Approach to Supporting Mental Wellness of STEM Students

This cross-discipline presentation will discuss ways to support students’ mental wellness so they can be successful both in the classroom and in life. The unique portrait of a STEM secondary student and their corresponding needs will guide our discussion of creating a tiered intervention approach, beginning in the classroom and including group interventions and individual clinical interventions. Ethical responsibilities and limitations of the school and various school roles will be discussed. Whatever the school’s resources or school role, everyone can take away strategies to implement in their school.

Presenters:
Danielle Armstrong
Ann Bonitatibus
Caitlin Palmer

Wellness/School Climate/Academic Integrity/Mindset
 

Community Building in the Virtual Classroom

Virtual academic programs provide unique opportunities for students who are qualified for residential secondary schools yet for whom a residential program is not the best fit. Many virtual programs lack opportunities that are available in residential programs. Therefore, the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics (SCGSSM) Accelerate Academic Experiences leverage qualities of both the virtual and residential academic environments, to provide hands on experiences and community and team building. These experiences afford students the opportunity to engage with some of the best aspects that both residential and virtual programs provide.

Presenters:
Brian Gloor
Laura Dostert

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

Interdisciplinary Activities in Finite Mathematics

Finite Mathematics is a course that offers students rich opportunities to study mathematics in multiple interdisciplinary contexts that are relevant and engaging.  In this session, we will discuss problems and activities included in Finite Mathematics courses based in both social science and biological contexts offered at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics.  Lesson materials, class activities, and assessments will be shared, and mathematical topics may include matrix applications (e.g., Leslie Model), apportionment, and graph theory.

Presenter:
Tamar Avineri

Mathematics
11 - 11:50 a.m.

Using Computer Algebra System in Teaching High School Physics

As computation has become vital in Physics research in the past years, we incorporated a Computer Algebra System (CAS) in teaching Physics to Grade 12 students. The advantage of using CAS is that it eliminates tedious mathematical work, allowing students to focus on the physics concept. With the ease provided by the computation, students can now handle problems that go beyond ideal cases. It also provides a variety of visualization tools. More importantly, it can be used to do numerical analysis of experimental data. The presentation will include actual implementation of the curriculum and responses of both teachers and students.

Presenter:
Maria Veronica S. Torralba

Science
 

Let's Talk: Selective Admission and Committee-Based Evaluation

Committee-based evaluation (CBE), a holistic approach to reviewing college admission applications, pairs admissions officers to discuss and analyze applicants' qualifications. Representatives from universities which have recently implemented CBE will share how this new approach helps their staff glean the context, achievement and aspirations of the applicants, and the importance of student essays and recommendation letters.

CBE has been featured in the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside HigherEd as a new and innovative approach in college admissions.

Presenters:
Dr. Yvonne Romero da Silva
James Atkins
Wes Wagonner

Admissions/Enrollment Management
 

Coding Powers Everything: Using the BBC Micro:Bit as a Teaching & Outreach Tool

This session will demonstrate how to use the BBC Micro:bit (a pocket-sized computer) to introduce students to the world of coding and as a tool to connect with potential students in outreach events. Participants will engage in hands-on activities using Micro:bits. One lucky participant will take home a Micro:bit Go kit.  Participants should bring a laptop or bluetooth enabled device to the session.

Presenters:
Denise Gregory
Daniel Moix

Computer Science
 

Minute Mathematics: Sharing the Beauty of Mathematics

In this talk, we will discuss several mathematical topics that can be explained to anyone in 8 minutes or less, but show the beauty and depth of mathematics. I will start by demonstrating the activities and then talk about how the activities can be used in the classroom, in math clubs, and for outreach. Some of the topics we will discuss are hexaflexagons, polyominoes (not polynomials!), Mobius bands, mathematical card tricks, and more.

Presenter:
Nicole Kroeger

Mathematics
 

Top 10 Pitfalls of Science Writing

Come discuss with us the most common pitfalls your students may encounter when they pursue a science topic through the review of cutting-edge science literature and communication with author-scientists, with the goal of writing a compelling science essay for a general audience.  We will share our Top 10 with you along with some illustrative student examples, some humorous, some surprising.  Our goal is for you to leave with a better understanding of what will help your students navigate, understand, and communicate primary and secondary literature for use in crafting science essay narratives.

Presenters:
Jennifer Seavey
Anne Applin

Humanities
 

Teamwork and Collaboration-Skills We Must Teach!

This immersive 50 minute lesson will explore stages of group development, personality types, team dynamics and conflict resolution.  The workshop will provide a template that can be used to teach the lesson immediately after experiencing it.  It is an excellent introductory topic in advance of any group project no matter what the curricular area.

Presenter:
Michael Barney

Interdisciplinary Studies/
All Curricular Areas
 

Leadership Education and Development in STEM High Schools

Leadership. Education. Development. How are we inspiring young adults to grow as good and ethical leaders? Leadership should not be defined by a title or label. It’s about developing the perspective, skills and personal style of the whole individual. Through the LEAD program at IMSA, we believe that leadership can be learned through discussion and application. Thus, we have designed a year long course that takes an intricate look at various definitions, theories, models, and conceptualizations of leadership. Students are challenged to think critically about leadership during peer-to-peer facilitated class discussions, hands-on exercises, and group work.

Presenters:
Andrea Stuiber
Katie Berger

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Leadership
2 - 2:50 p.m.

Modeling in the Physiology Classroom

Physiology and Disease is a Biology elective at IMSA that has been developed to be mostly student-centered.  Some examples of student projects include modeling heart structure to reflect function and creating LED arduino monitors to measure heart rate.  Students also measure their lung capacity and blood pressure to demonstrate correlation of these values with heart rate, and trace the correlation back to neuronal controls. Projects such as these integrate other disciplines such as engineering and conform to NGSS Science and Engineering standards and NGSS Cross cutting Concepts standards. Students take responsibility for their own learning and articulate better on tests.

Presenter:
Sowmya Anjur

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Science and Engineering
 

Statistics: Demos, Experiments and Projects

In this roundtable discussion, we will share ideas about experiments, journal articles, project topics, and teaching demos that are used in Statistics classes. We will also spend time discussing the American Statistical Association's Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Guidelines which provide recommendations for teaching Statistics. Come with your favorite teaching ideas to share. This discussion is open to anyone who has an interest in teaching Statistics even if you have not yet taught the course.

Presenter:
Nicole Kroeger

Mathematics
 

Designing an Interdisciplinary Course in Cryptography

NCSSM is currently designing a interdisciplinary cryptography course to teach applications in number theory and an introduction to programming in Python. Come hear about the design process and details of the course! We plan to offer this course as both a math elective and a computer science graduation requirement in the 2018-2019 academic year. Content standards and sample assessments will be shared with participants.

Presenter:
Taylor Gibson

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Mathematics & Computer Science
 

Writing on the Wall: The immigrant experience through poetry, from Angel Island to DACA

This presentation will offer a brief historical overview of US Immigration Policy from Angel Island and Chinese Exclusion to current debates about the status of undocumented immigrants. We will then examine, discuss, and analyze poems taken and translated from the walls of Angel Island. Finally, we will draw parallels and distinctions between those works and the works of the contemporary poets Sandra Cisneros, Zilka Joseph, and Javier Zamora, who write about the immigrant experience today.  Poetry can be a particularly effective method of encouraging students to connect to historical ideas and current controversies on a personal level.

Presenter:
Katie Moulder

Humanities
 

Using Social Media to Conduct Brown Bag Chats in a Digital Age

Students enrolled in NCSSS schools have very demanding schedules. So much so that finding time to engage college and university recruiters has become a challenge. This initiative employees the traditional brown bag lunch and learn sessions redefined for 21st century learners, using virtual and social media platforms as a means of engagement. Secondary benefits include expanded reach and economic feasibility.

Presenter:
Letita Mason
Dr. Dedra Eatmon

College and/or Career Counseling
 

The creation and evolution of the PROMISE and EXCEL programs at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

The PROMISE and Excel programs are for students in 7th-9th grade focusing on students interested in STEM from culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse backgrounds.  The PROMISE and Excel programs run both during the school year and summer for a variety of enrichment opportunities. We will be discussing the history, current focus, and future of the program as well as the successes and positive failures we have experienced as administrators and teachers of the program. We will also be discussing the development of the IMSA students used as mentors within the program.

Presenters:
Anita White
Julie Dowling

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
3 - 3:50 p.m.

Developing Curriculum for Project-Based Engineering Courses

Looking to add project-based engineering to your school’s offerings? Already teaching engineering but searching for new and creative projects? While many schools are finally focusing on the “E” in STEM, many teachers and administrators are at a loss on how to begin. As a newer addition to traditional schools, most engineering curricula publicly available is “one size fits all” and comes with little background preparation. This presentation and interactive workshop will focus on the core academic values of teaching hands-on, project-based engineering and how to develop fun and collaborative projects that are tailored to your school’s unique needs.

Presenter:
Alison Earnhart

Engineering/Makerspace/Technology
 

Engaging High School Girls with Social and Ethical Technologies

Educators will use sensors and portable computers with custom coding to experience unique wearable technologies.  The projects emphasize solving societal problems with computer science, including health and wellness applications and interactive animal perception experiences that increase awareness of conservation issues and empathy for global management of environmental resources.  Attendees will be able to discuss unique requirements of engagement for many female students and will gain see how in creating projects using circuits, building wearable devices, and applying design processes, using computational thinking strategies, and coding, girls can flourish in STEM classes and consider STEM careers beyond high school.

Presenter:
Charlotte Dungan

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Computer Science, Science, Technology, Diversity, Outreach/Pipelines
 

Event Driven Programmming in JavaFX

This will be a "dirty hands" introduction to the JavaFX GUI framework.  It will be of special interest to teachers who are teaching the principles of object-oriented programming and who would like to see an application of it that will attract a lot of student interest.  

Also, there will be a brief introduction to Java9's JShell, which turns out to be a very nice teaching tool.  So, install Java9 on your PC,  update your path, and get ready for some hands-on fun.

This framework runs on Mac, PC and Linux.   You will definitely want to have your PC!

Presenter:
John Morrison

Computer Science
 

Exploring Other Worlds: a Project in Planetary Science Class

Planetary science is a highly interdisciplinary field, it often requires knowledge of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and atmospheric science. In addition much of what we know of planets and moons come from missions that are exemplars of good engineering practices. In order to give my students a very basic understanding of what a planetary scientist does, they do a project that simulates the process of designing, proposing, operating, and analyzing the data from a robotic mission to a planet or moon. In this workshop, participants will work in groups to go through the steps of this project.

Presenter:
Eric Hawker

Science
 

Implementing Entrepreneurship & The Design Thinking Process Across Disciplines

This interactive workshop focuses on incorporating a problem solving design process across  computer science and entrepreneurship curriculums. Attendees will learn how to incorporate the design process and entrepreneurial concepts into their computer science classrooms. Attendees will be design a marketable solution to a real market problem using rapid development CS tools to develop their testable prototype. Attendees will take away a clear vision of how to use the design thinking process in their classrooms and how to add entrepreneurial concepts to the computer science curriculum.

Presenters:
Laura Boyd Smidt
John Chapin

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Entrepreneurship (Humanities) and Computer Science
 

Introduction to Virtual Reality

Join us for an introduction to Virtual Reality and the impact this technology is having on a wide range of industries. Participants will have an opportunity to experience VR with Oculus platforms and explore some of the exciting creative applications that are available. Participants will also will also experiment with creating a simple 360 project and explore stitching and editing techniques.

Presenter:
Michael Chaney, SCAD Professor of Film and Television

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Technology, Computer Science, Makerspace
 

Creating Pathways for Interdisciplinary Research in a STEM High School Environment

In this workshop, participants will hear about efforts to create interdisciplinary research opportunities at the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science & Mathematics.  Leaders will summarize the research program conducted in 2017, lessons learned from that pilot, and work with their 2018 program.  Subsequent small-group discussion of research experiences that participants would like to organize at their own institutions will focus on choosing relevant societal problems to solve, organizing teaching teams, networking with experts, and navigating bureaucracy.  Participants can expect to leave the session with an outline of an interdisciplinary research program that could be implemented at their own schools.

Presenters:
Kathryn de Ridder-Vignone
Antonio de Ridder-Vignone
Elaine Parshall

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Humanities (science and technology studies, cultural studies, foreign language, communication, sociology) & engineering
Friday, November 9
9-9:50 a.m.

Academic Transition: a course designed to ease students’ adjustment to the rigors of a STEM school & reduce attrition

The SCGSSM student body, like many STEM schools, is typically populated with students who’ve rarely had to study hard or organize their time prior to enrolling with us. Our challenge: increase our students’ skills in these areas, knowing they doubted they needed help with either one. Our solution: create a course focused primarily on the scientific theories behind effective studying and time management.
We will discuss the decisions leading up to this course, its design and implementation, the successes, challenges and feedback received and adaptations for Fall 2018. Ample sample material will be available.

Presenters:
Kyle Anne Barnett
Danny Dorsel

Administration
 

Culturally Responsive STEM

In today’s diverse classrooms, educators must embrace the cultural identities of the students they teach.   In this roundtable discussion, we will open a useful dialogue that seeks to inform culturally responsive teaching practices in STEM classrooms. Let’s discuss the best way to impact ALL students!

Presenters:
Allen Antoine
Dr. Kristen Antoine-Morse

Diversity
 

Exporting Excellence: How ASMSA’s Teacher Outreach Program Increases Teacher Capacity in Arkansas

This session will introduce ASMSA's blended approach to Computer Science, AP Biology and Entrepreneurship teacher mentorship and share the successes from the design, recruiting and deployment perspectives of this innovative outreach program.  The technology infrastructure, the professional development model, the student experiences, and the lessons learned will be shared.

Presenters:
Whitney Holden, Ph.D.
Patrycja Krakowiak
Daniel Moix
Steven Rice

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

Highlight Your History to Reach Alumni, Funders, Researchers and the Merely Curious

Digitizing your archive and making it publicly available can help you reach alumni, funders, researchers and others curious about your school, and help widen your digital footprint. By doing so you leverage your history, highlights and strengths. Alumni get an opportunity to relive their time at your school, potentially making them more likely to donate. Potential funders can mine the site and assure themselves that their money will be well-spent. Researchers and other curious souls have access to records without physically visiting your campus.

Presenter:
Robin Boltz

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

Sprouting Interest in the Plant Sciences

Plants are a necessary, but often overlooked, component of our everyday lives.  As a botanical educator at the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics, my goal is to foster student interest in the plants through both my Advanced Placement Biology course and my advanced Botany elective.  By presenting plants in an approachable manner through the use of scientific summaries, plant demonstrations, and inquiry-based learning, I aim to encourage students to recognize this important field of biology.  How do you incorporate plants in classroom?  How can we improve student understanding and appreciation of plants?

Presenter:
Jennifer Brown

Science
 

Strategies for Teaching Diversity and Inclusion in Pre-Modern Literature

Pre-modern literature is rarely the first place instructors turn when we want to engage students in questions about diversity and inclusion. Yet, the pre-modern world was not homogenous—people of color existed, as did intersectional identities—and, as a whole, the pre-modern world was multicultural, multiracial, and multi-faith. This session will discuss the methods and resources for teaching pre-modern literature as global and diverse, as well as the value of using these texts to examine our own cultural assumptions about diversity and inclusion.

Presenter:
Justin Barker

Humanities
 

Research - It’s Not Just for Scientists

Roald Hoffman won a Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1981. In 1987, he published his first book of poems. We will discuss the pleasures and advantages that result when students pursue are offered opportunities to challenge themselves in scientific and artistic thought. We will present methods we have used to encourage students to take risks in areas they may be curious about in a wide array of disciplines.

Presenters:
Richard Weems
Todd Crane

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Humanities, science, research
10-10:50 a.m.

Designing a College Transition Curriculum

The session reviews the curriculum of a 10-week residential education course for high school juniors designed to guide students through the college application process. We will discuss the student and staff concerns that resulted in the creation of the course, how the course addresses these concerns, and how the course impacts students’ college application process as they transition into senior year. There will also be opportunities to explore how the course could be applied to different environments, how it impacts students’ stress levels and perception of success, and how it affects counseling staff and their interactions with students.

Presenter:
Ian Oliver

College and/or Career Counseling
 

Thoughtful Scheduling: A Surprising Avenue for Student Support

Motivated, intelligent students often seek out challenge and involvement at a level that can leave them overwhelmed and have a detrimental impact to their well being. We will explore how schools use graduation requirements, scheduling, course choice, and course offerings to encourage healthy student boundaries and behaviors. We will grapple with ways to encourage students to choose courses that support their well-being, rather than focusing on courses they believe will look good on their transcripts. Let’s learn from one another the current practices and innovative ideas schools use, and leave with different perspectives to improve scheduling and curriculum management practices.

Presenters:
Linsey Morrison
Jennifer Betz
Phillip Riggs

Admissions/Enrollment Management
 

The "SPARK" that Ignites Corporate Partnerships

SPARK Conferences  (Symposium Promoting Advancement of Real-World Knowledge) expose students to STEM careers and relevant topics related to science and technology. The Academy for Science and Design, New Hampshire’s top-performing STEM-focused public charter school and National Blue Ribbon recipient,  has created and implemented SPARK, which serves as the most successful vehicle for corporate engagement and relationship development.  Participants will understand  the value of implementing a SPARK Conference Series as well a “nuts and bolts” perspective on how to organize their own SPARK Conference, including useful materials/strategies for publicity and corporate partnership development.

Presenter:
Jennifer Cava

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

Sustainable Pollinator Gardens with Research Applications

Elk Grove High School, a comprehensive school located adjacent to Chicago's O'Hare Airport, set out to create a Native Plantings/Pollinator space. Over 100 students, in design teams, conducted research on native plantings, costs, create labor schedules and then presenting findings to a panel of judges. Now after removing the current grass that occupied the space, native plants, seeds, and plugs were laid out under consultation and guidance of the Cook County Forest Preserve District & University of Illinois Extension Program. Future plans call for students to do active research with the space in AP Environmental and AP Biology classes, and we are actively seeking more ways to integrate this into the courses with a focus on real world applications.

Presenters:
Kyle Burritt
Quinn Loch

Research
 

Our Stories: Beyond the Classroom

My students are a diverse lot hailing from India, China, Russia, Japan, Africa, West Indies, and even Iowa and Michigan. After completing Willa Cather's "My Antonia," a story of immigrants in America, My students respond by writing their own accounts of family. These memoirs are often  mesmerizing tales of sacrifice and struggle, but with doses of humor and a fairy-tale quality.  I do not know why it took so long, but I now realize that these stories needed to be shared beyond my classroom. For in my students' diversity lies their commonality. Hence, the theater piece of my devising.

Presenter:
William Hathaway

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Humanities, Diversity, School Climate
 

Utilizing Website Evaluation Criteria in Selecting Online Resources

In this workshop, the authors guide the reader through 5 evaluation criteria,  to search, identify and select good educational resources. At the end of the session, participants will also be able to reflect the importance of evaluating websites before using it.

Presenter:
Jayson Bingcang

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Media and Information Literacy
 

Overworked by Homework- How to Make Independent Assignments More Meaningful

The perception of homework is often drastically different for teachers and students. Teachers are challenged to design assignments that engage students in a meaningful, authentic, and lasting way. Our current students are a generation that have access to unlimited information and share (and sometimes overshare) everything- including their latest homework assignment. Although social media and the internet can have many benefits, it can involve hours of distraction- resulting in hours of attempting homework. This session is designed to gather teachers to discuss how to engage Gen Z students outside of the classrooms by making homework assignments effective and less tedious.

Presenters:
Cailin Daly
Rachel Wax

Interdisciplinary Studies/
All classes
11-11:50 a.m.

Environmental Impact- Using Digital Media to Focus Student Learning

Environmental issues are global challenges that our students will have to address in their future. Addressing these issues through curriculum helps bring purpose to students’ learning. We have developed a capstone project in our introductory biology class that allows students to engage in these issues in a creative and personalized manner, and which asks students to not only address the biology at the core of these issues but also suggest possible solutions to the problem.  In this session, we will share how we scaffold our curriculum to prepare students for this experience, as well as show examples of student work.

Presenters:
Sarah O'Leary-Driscoll
Crystal Randall

Science
 

Community Outreach: Strategies for Forging Successful School-to-Business Partnerships

In STEM education, there exists little debate regarding the value of partnerships between professionals in the community and the school.  However, creating and maintaining those partnerships are difficult tasks.  Where do you even begin?

This session will answer this question and more by providing methods for partnership development that have proved successful at the Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology over the past 11 years of its Partnership Program. Learn from experienced Partnership Coordinators who collectively manage over 150 partnerships and 400 internship placements per year.  Their techniques provide concrete strategies to engage community members in sustainable partnerships.

Presenters:
Kerri Napoleon, Ph.D.
Nicole D'Antonio

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

Defining Educational Goals & Assessments for Student Research Experiences: Challenges, Tradition, and Variety

Student research experiences have received increased emphasis as high-value educational opportunities, particularly for STEM students. The objectives that are appropriate for an individual student research experience program depend on the unique features of each program. Discussion will include participants sharing thoughts on the educational objectives of research experiences. The discussion will also focus on identifying assessments for these objectives. The results of this discussion should be a step toward a framework of shared best practices for effective student research experiences, collaboration on evaluation, and leadership to other secondary schools interested in developing student research experiences opportunities.

Presenters:
Joshua T. Witten
Randall M. LaCross

Research
 

Diversity and Inclusion in the Science Classroom

A Diversity, Epidemiology and social justice unit was incorporated into the Physiology and Disease curriculum in Fall 2016. Students discussed topics such as social and cultural influences on diversity thinking, and selective treatment in hospitals based on race.  It was very noteworthy that students were united in their thinking regarding diversity and inclusion, despite the fact that they were from different backgrounds and diverse cultures.  In 2017, additional discussions were held on equity in education.  Students who were otherwise reserved were encouraged enough to express their views, and everyone appreciated the fact that they had been included.

Presenter:
Sowmya Anjur

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Science and Humanities
 

From Traditional School to STEM Certified in 2 years

In the Fall of 2015, Rockhurst High School began its STEAM initiative. One of its first steps was to attend the NCSSS Conference in New York City. In the Spring of 2017, Rockhurst became STEM Certified by AdvancED. Learn how Rockhurst learned how to apply beliefs, principles and practices of NCSSS schools to its context in order to enhance the educational experience of Rockhurst students.

Presenters:
Greg Owsley
Paul Winkeler

Administration
 

Fostering Success Among African American Students From  Low SES Backgrounds in the STEM Fields; Strategies for Professional School Counselors and Educators

This presentation will focus on recruiting, preparing, and supporting African American students from low SES backgrounds into STEM careers.  Strategies and techniques from an academic, personal/social, and career development perspective for this population will be explored.  Finally, collaborative efforts that can be utilized among stakeholders will be highlighted.

Presenter:
Tylon Crook

Diversity
 

Agri or Agree? : Impact of Agriculture Elective on Special Science High School Students in the Philippines

The education session will focus on presenting the impact of having an agriculture elective class in a science high school with most students growing up in an urban setting.The elective allowed students to understand the importance of knowing the processes and struggles of producing goods from farm to table. It also informed students on the plight of the Philippine Agriculture, farmers, aquaculture practioners and market sellers. Students were given the opportunities to engage in hands on activities like farming, livestock raising and aquaculture. Supplemental educational trips were also offered to strengthen the understanding of students on agriculture.

Presenters:
Justin Ray M. Guce
Chuckie Fer A. Calsado

Science
1:30 - 2:20 p.m.

Teaching Artificial Intelligence Through Game Programming

At the Bronx High School of Science, in the post - AP Computer Science Game Programming classes, our students are engaged in the learning of AI (artificial intelligence) algorithms through the design and implementation of computer games including board games with human players playing against computer programs, video games with game controlled characters making intelligent moves, and natural language processing games with chatbots who has "learning" capabilities.

Presenter:
Wendy Qiu

Computer Science
 

Using 21st Century Technology to teach 14th Century Skills

What do castles, hurdy-gurdies, 3D Printers, and coding have in common? Come with me to 14th Century England and find out how student-led interdisciplinary projects in history and literature can be fueled and augmented by STEM technologies and student interests.

Presenter:
Michael McCartney

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Humanities, Computer Science, Engineering/Makerspace/Technology
 

Productivity and Life-Long Learning Best Practices for Educators

Modern workplaces and digital schools were supposed to be paragons of productivity yet the expectations placed on our professional and personal time seem to be at an all-time high. How did our lives get so crazy and what can we do about it? This session will provide real-world advice on how to reconsider your workflow both as a professional educator and a lifelong learner to help you more effectively address what is important and learn to ignore the rest.

Presenters:
Todd Crane
Richard Weems

Interdisciplinary Studies/
Across the academic curriculum & Career Counseling & Wellness
 

Involving Students in Authentic Conservation Research

Discover the empowerment, independence, and learning that comes with cutting edge biodiversity field research.  As scientists, we recognize the importance of credible field work.  Field trips are great, but imagine your students working alongside research scientists, developing protocols, collecting information and contributing to the published body of original research.

Presenters:
Lisa Wu
Scott Sveiven
Freddy Herrera

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

IMSA Allies Program: The Power of Near-Pear Teaching

IMSA ALLIES is a STEM leadership development program that trains high school students as teachers and group leaders to deliver inquiry based hands on science, technology, engineering and mathematics activities (STEM) in the community. In this session you will learn about the benefits of this type of program and how to implement one at your school.

Presenters:
Gwen Seeley-Joosse
Megan Scherer

Outreach/Partnerships/Pipelines/Summer Programs
 

Digital Storytelling: Promotional Videos with Nearly No Budget

How to create high-quality branded videos to promote the school with nearly no budget. Using only a smartphone and knowing some basic skills of lighting, video, and interviewing will allow professional videos at a fraction of the cost.

Presenter:
Ryan McDonald

Admissions/Enrollment Management
 

How do we balance Depth vs Breadth?

In many high-level courses such as Advanced Placement (AP), IB, or dual-enrollment, students are expected to learn a large number of topics.  This expectation suggests teaching topics at a rapid pace.  However, research and experience shown that active learning through discussion, projects, and problem-solving improve long-term learning.  How do we achieve the best learning outcomes for our students in the time available?   How do we cover the breadth of topics expected for an end of course exam while fostering in-depth understanding of the information covered?   We will discuss the benefits and challenges of including in-depth lessons in the curriculum.

Presenter:
Jennifer Taylor

Science
2:30-4 p.m.

Bringing VR to Life with 360º/VR Cinema Cameras

Join Savannah College of Art and Design faculty for an up-close look at several 360º/VR live action cinema cameras and discover current and emerging applications of wrap-around perspective technology.

Participants will explore the workflow of shooting, stitching, editing, and uploading content for viewing in VR headsets.

 
 

Hands-on Project Based STEM Learning at MIT Beaver Works Summer Institute

MIT Beaver Works Summer Institute (BWSI) is a rigorous four-week project-based STEM program designed for rising high school seniors. Accepted students partake in one of the eight world-class courses, each of which focuses on real-world problems such as autonomy, robotics, engineering and everything in between.

To ensure each of the 200+ students have a successful summer, BWSI coordinates with 100+ high schools to nominate and prepare students via online coursework. The presentation will provide an overview of the summer and online coursework, a live hands-on demo, testimonials from collaborating instructors, and a discussion on effectively incorporating BWSI materials into a curriculum.

Workshop includes a live hands-on demo with the RACECAR platform.

 
 

Space University

Space exploration can be expensive and time consuming, however Near Space exploration can be planned and executed in just a couple of days!

In this workshop, learn how NASA conducts research in the upper layers of our atmosphere and the student citizen science currently being performed through the Space Center University for Atmospheric Research program.

Join us and launch a tethered weather balloon with GoPros, 360 cameras, experiments and sensors to demonstrate the research that can be conducted on a Near Space balloon flight. Bring your imagination and excitement as we Dare Mighty Things!

 

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